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Want to Get Better Guest Survey Results? Here Are Four Tips

Guest Satisfaction Surveys (GSS) represent a critical way to solicit direct feedback from guests and evaluate guest sentiment. By using survey feedback to guide improvements, hotels can prevent negative reviews, increase guest loyalty and attract new guests.

While many hotels send out guest surveys, few employ them to their best potential. At a time when consumers are bombarded with survey requests, a well-designed survey will generate higher completion rates and more valuable insights than the generic, one-size-fits-all surveys that most hotels send out.

Great conversion on guest surveys depends on a number of factors: design, subject line, wording and question logic all play a part. At the end of the day, the quality of feedback received from guest surveys is only as good as the quality of the questions asked.

Here are four tips for structuring your questions:

1. Use rating scales that require guests to assign a value to departments or attributes. Three common types of rating scales are numeric, graphic and descriptive.

RATING SCALE: A feature in a survey question that requires the guest to assign a value to the department or attribute they are being asked to evaluate. Three common types of rating scales are numeric, graphic and descriptive. There are different schools of thought on whether a rating scale should have an odd or even number. With an odd rating scale such as 1 to 5, respondents can select 3 as a neutral option. With an even rating scale, there is no middle point, forcing guests to choose a negative or positive option.

2. Rather than ask simple yes or no questions, use a Likert Scale to measure attitudes and opinions by asking respondents to indicate their level of agreement or disagreement with a statement such as “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”.

LIKERT SCALE: A rating scale used to measure the attitudes and opinions of customers. Rather than give a simple yes or no answer, respondents are asked to indicate their level of agreement or disagreement with a statement based on a range of categories such as “strongly disagree” to “strongly agree”. Alternative scales can measure levels of satisfaction, frequency, importance or likelihood.

3. Use question logic to dig deeper. For example, if a guest gives a rating of 3 or lower out of 5 in a category, trigger a follow-up question to solicit details.

QUESTION LOGIC: A survey technique in which additional questions are hidden or displayed depending on the guest’s response to a question. For example, if a guest gives a rating of 3 out of 5 or lower for the hotel restaurant, a follow-up question is triggered to solicit details. Or, if the guest indicates that they did not use the restaurant, the survey skips to the next section.

4. Calculate your Net Promoter Score® (NPS) by asking guests how likely they are to recommend your hotel to a friend or colleague on a scale from 0 to 10. NPS is calculated by taking the percentage of promoters (score 9-10) and subtracting the percentage of detractors (score 0-6).

THE ULTIMATE QUESTION: NPS is derived from a survey question known as The Ultimate Question: “On a scale from zero to 10, how likely is it that you would recommend us to a friend or colleague?” NPS is considered a strong indicator of loyalty because customers are asked if they’re willing to put their own reputation on the line.

Would you like to improve your surveys?