“Stop trying to delight your customers”? Only if you want them to stop talking about you!

Yesterday I referenced an article and research study presented in the Harvard Business Review that suggested customer service should focus primarily on providing fast resolution to issues with minimal effort required on the customers’ part.

That’s fine, but I have an issue with the article title: “Stop trying to delight your customers.” To be fair, it was used to draw attention to the core idea in the article: increasing the speed of issue resolution as a way to build loyalty. “Exceeding customer expectations has a negligible impact on customer loyalty,” the authors stated.

But if going above and beyond when providing service has minimal impact on customer loyalty, there is one huge, very important reason why your hotel company must still make remarkable service a strategic priority.

WOW service gets people talking.

In an environment where your customers have seen it all before, providing a personal human touch is often the tipping point that makes a jaded traveler tweet about the hotel or leave a glowing review.

Providing remarkable service is a strategy used by the Roger Smith Hotel. It’s a strategy used by citizenM Hotels. It’s the strategy used by Corinthia Hotels that led to Marc Benioff not only tweeting about the hotel but highlighting the organization as a leader in customer service.

The lesson is clear: if you want positive word-of-mouth to spread your brand, make sure your team is providing service worth talking about.

Download: 15 Great Examples of Remarkable Service That Earns Social Media Attention


See how ReviewPro can help you provide the type of service that turns guests into “salespeople” for your hotel.

1 Comment

There is 1 comment in this article:

  1. Nick says:

    Phrases like, “Exceeding customer expectations has a negligible impact on customer loyalty” are loaded with so many assumptions.

    How do we measure “exceeding”? How do we measure “loyalty”? Does loyalty lead to sales? What is the relationship between loyalty and likelihood to share with friends?

    Garbage in, garbage out–these things are only as good as the assumptions used to create them!
    Nick

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